A very, very different America (shaped through U.S. immigration policy)

The year is 1924; the U.S. Congress has just passed the Johnson-Reed Act (Immigration Act of 1924) and the following quotas have been put into place to determine how many immigrants from each country will be eligible for U.S. citizenship:







Country

Quota


Country

Quota


Country

Quota


Germany


51,227



Poland


5,982



Africa (non-Egypt)


1,100
Great Britain and Northern Ireland 34,007
Italy 3,845
Armenia
124
Irish Free State (Ireland) 28,567
Czechoslovakia 3,073
Australia
121
Sweden 9,561
Russia 2,248
Palestine
100
Norway 6,453
Yugoslavia 671
Syria
100
France 3,954
Romania 603
Turkey
100
Denmark 2,789
Portugal 503
Egypt
100
Switzerland 2,081
Hungary 473
New Zealand & Pacific Islands
100
Netherlands 1,648
Lithuania 344
All others
1,900
Austria 785
Latvia 142


Belgium 512
Spain 131


Finland 471
Estonia 124


Free City of Danzig 228
Albania 100


Iceland 100
Bulgaria 100


Luxembourg 100
Greece 100













Total (Number) 142,483
Total (Number) 18,439
Total (Number)
3,745
Total (%) 86.5
Total (%) 11.2
Total (%)
2.3









(Total Annual immigrant quota: 164,667)









Note that the limit for migrants from the "Free City of Danzig" was set at 228 persons; that's from a site with under 370,000 occupants. Compare that to the limit set for Spain, a state with roughly 30 million inhabitants: 131 persons!

Italy's 3,845 is also noteworthy - that's from a population of roughly 37 million.

The limit for Germany was 51,227 persons, from Germany's population of roughly 62 million. Britain, Ireland and Sweden are also noteworthy. It's clear what cultures we believed would produce productive and inventive individuals, and what standards we had set not necessarily due to "blind racism", but because we thought this system would be best for our own country.

Comments

  1. Anonymous28 May, 2012

    My Italian grandmother came to this country in the 1920's under this quota.
    I mentioned this once in a college "multi-cultural" class.The professor brought the topic up.He asked me what I thought of the law.I said that I agree with the quota law and that it makes sense to me.
    Many of my fellow students became enraged with me.I was somehow very stupid.I was somehow acquiescing to "hatred for Italians".
    I was actually shouted at in the class while the professor stood there smiling.
    The students came fom many various backgrounds.I was the only American of Italian descent in the class,yet the students thought it very important for me to come to the conclusion that all and any Italians can come here.Anything less than that is somehow "hatred", according to the professor and many of the students.
    There's alot of cultural pressure to accept the opening up of the country to the whole world without any restraints whatsoever.
    The lawmakers back then had more loyalty and patriotism for this country than our lawmakers today.
    The US has been a great blessing for my family and many other Italians.There's no hatred in this law,just some loyalty and respect for those who came first.Hardly hatred.
    Americans need to wake up and start seeing reality instead of allowing themselves to be so easily indoctrinated.
    Thank you for the article.Joe

    ReplyDelete

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